Cobba’s Round 13 Footy Graph – The Lion’s fairytale

Once upon a time the three little pigs came to a river.
“We need to cross this river,” said the youngest little pig.
“But we can’t swim across,” said the middle little pig, “there is a crocodile in the river.”
“Then we will need to build boats,” said the oldest little pig.
The three little pigs went to find things to build their boats with.
The youngest little pig found a field full of straw.
“Straw floats,” said the youngest little pig. “I shall build my boat from straw.”
The youngest little big collected lots and lots of straw.
The middle little pig found a thicket of sticks.
“Wood floats,” said the middle little pig. “I shall build my boat from wood.”
The middle little pig collected lots and lots of sticks.
The oldest little pig went to a scrap metal yard and collected lots and lots of metal.
“I shall build my boat from metal,” said the oldest little pig.
The three little pigs returned to the river bank where the crocodile watched them construct their boats. The youngest little pig constructed a raft from his straw and attached a sail. The middle little pig constructed a dingy from wood and carved oars. The oldest little pig welded together his metal to the tune of the A-Team, and attached an outboard motor.
“Metal does not float,” said the youngest little pigs.
“Floating is about displacing more than the weight of the boat in water,” said the oldest little pig, who had been on an open university engineering course.
Pleased with his boat, the youngest little pig set off across the river, and the crocodile swam over.
“Little pig, little pig,” said the crocodile. “Won’t you come and swim with me?”
“No, no, no,” said the youngest little pig. “Not by the hairs of my chiny chin chin. I won’t come and swim with you.”
“Then I shall snip and I shall snap, and I shall break your boat of straw in two,” said the crocodile.
The crocodile snipped and snapped and broke the straw boat in two, before gobbling up the youngest little pig.
“That shall not happen to me,” said the middle little pig. Pleased with his boat, the middle little pig set off across the river, rowing as fast as he could. The crocodile swam over.
“Little pig, little pig,” said the crocodile. “Won’t you come and swim with me?”
“No, no, no,” said the middle little pig, hitting the crocodile with an oar. “Not by the hairs of my chiny chin chin. I won’t come and swim with you.”
“Then I shall snip and I shall snap, and I shall break your boat of sticks in two,” said the crocodile, rubbing his snout.
The crocodile snipped and snapped and broke the wooden boat in two, before gobbling up the middle little pig.
“That shall not happen to me,” said the oldest little pig. Pleased with his boat, the oldest little pig set off across the river, and the metal boat did displace its own weight in water and floated. The crocodile swam over.
“Little pig, little pig,” said the crocodile. “Won’t you come and swim with me?”
“No, no, no,” said the oldest little pig, gunning the engine. “Not by the hairs of my chiny chin chin. I won’t come and swim with you.”
“Then I shall snip and I shall snap, and I shall break your boat of metal in two,” said the crocodile, swimming faster to keep up.
And the crocodile snipped and snapped, but succeeded only in breaking a few teeth. Hurting, the crocodile swam off never to be seen again, and the oldest little pig made it safely to the other bank.
Three billy goats gruff were watching the whole affair unfold.
“Why didn’t they use the bridge?” asked smallest billy goat gruff.
“Beats me,” said the biggest billy goat gruff, and they tripped trapped back across the bridge.

 

^^^That right there is an example of a bad fairytale. I don’t know who wrote it, but it wasn’t funny at all. Kind of reminds me of the crappy jokes you get inside of those Christmas Bon-Bons that just really try to hard. But the worst part is, that you spent a much longer time reading that crap above.

What happened on the weekend, wasn’t a bad fairytale. It was a bloody marvelous fairytale in fact (unless you are a Geelong supporter of course).

Sunday night at the Gabba was what dreams are made of. Down by 52 points at the 21 minute mark of the 3rd quarter, Brisbane stepped up to the plate. Ash McGrath’s 55m goal after the siren in his 200th AFL match sealed one of the greatest comebacks in Brisbane’s history. Lions won by 5 points.

Who would’ve thought? But back to that later…

Scroll down to see a the graph of great comebacks in VFL/AFL history…

 

In other news…

 

The other major upset of the round belonged to the Port Adelaide Football Club. President, David Koch, was visibly delighted when the team fought through the mud and wet to bring home a 18 point victory for the club.

Port ruined the comeback game for Sydney’s debut, Kurt Tippet, who kicked two goals in the opening term, but it was an emerging star, Chad Wingard who bettered this and finished the game with 3 goals.

The Swans’ score of 8.6-54 was their lowest posted this year, and lowest since 6.14-50 def by Adelaide in Round 15, 2011 at Football Park.

Soiling their streak of 8 losses against the Swans, it was also Port Adelaide’s first ‘home’ victory over Sydney since round 12, 2004.

It was the first time since their 18 point defeat (same margin) over Hawthorn in 2009, that Port Adelaide have beaten the reigning premier.

The result overshadowed a milestone for Sydney’s premiership heroes Adam Goodes and Jude Bolton, who have played as teammates in 300 games since round 12, 1999. They are only 7 games short of the record held by Adelaide’s Tyson Edwards and Andrew McLeod (307 from R11, 1995 and R11, 2010).
However, the trio of Goodes, Bolton and fellow teammate, Ryan O’Keefe have played 254 games together, beating the record previously held by Western Bulldog’s Brad Johnson, Rohan Smith and Scott West.

 

As Rogers Results points out, Sydney have found the following year after a premiership somewhat difficult in their history. Having only marginally successful win rates in the year proceeding.

SYD/SM Match/Win %
1919 83.33%
1934 75.00%
2013 70.83%
2006 58.33%
1910 58.33%

But the game of the round surely belonged to Michael Voss’ Lions.

In what looked like a routine victory for the second-placed Cats, a Gabba crowd of just 24164, saw the underdogs fight back in dramatic style. Led by club games record holder, Simon Black (See this in my Round 12 Footy Graph!) who had an season equal-best 33 disposals and 20 contested possessions (his best since R17, 2007 v Collingwood, 21).

Ash McGrath’s goal after the siren was the 2nd recorded this year, and the 4th in the last 2 years.Much higher than the previous average of 1 every 3 years! (Check out my Round 8 Footy Graph on the subject!)

The Lions stormed home with 9 consecutive goals, after trailing by 27 at half time, and 38 at 3 quarter time.

Record 3/4 time deficit Round Team Score Defeated Score
#1 45 Round 16, 1995, Gabba Bris Bears 14.20 (104) Hawthorn 14.13 (97)
#E10 38 Round 13, 2013, Gabba Bris Lions 15.13 (103) Geelong 14.14 (98)
Great Scott!

Great Scott!

Interestingly, it was the only Brisbane victory ever, where they have solely won the last quarter.

Shockingly, Brisbane’s 38 point margin at 3 quarter time is only the second highest margin they have overcome at that break, as their R16, 1995 effort against Hawthorn is the league record (45 points).

Their score is one of only two matches won by Brisbane, where their last quarter score was more than 50% of their total score. (The other being 58.65% from the 1995 Hawthorn match).

 

On-the-other hand, the 43 point margin in the last quarter was the largest the Cats have endured since their 50 point 4th quarter hiding from Collingwood in R3, 2003.

38 points is the highest 3 quarter time lead by Geelong in a match that they lost. (previous: 36 points v West Coast R10, 2006).

 

Anyway, here is how the Lions fairytale win sits in the all-time VFL/AFL history…

Great Comebacks

 

They all lived happily ever after,

Cobba.

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